Answers

2015-08-22T13:28:14+05:30
Let us begin at a notional beginning. I have an image in my head of a band of Neanderthals (or some similar troupe of humanoids) hunkered round the fire at the cave-mouth as the night is drawing in. One of them says, spontaneously: “You’ll never believe what happened to me today.” Gnawed bones are tossed aside, children are quietened and the tribe gives the storyteller its full attention. The anecdote, the fond reminiscence, the protracted joke, the pointed recollection are surely the genesis of the short stories we write and read today. You could argue that storytelling in one form or other is hardwired into our human discourse as if—as soon as our sense of time past and time future evolved in our awakening consciousnesses—we became aware we could shape the telling of our personal histories and imagine possibilities that would enchant, terrify, enthral, admonish, titillate—and the rest of the gamut of emotions that attend a compelling story.
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