Answers

  • Brainly User
2015-08-23T16:15:48+05:30

This Is a Certified Answer

×
Certified answers contain reliable, trustworthy information vouched for by a hand-picked team of experts. Brainly has millions of high quality answers, all of them carefully moderated by our most trusted community members, but certified answers are the finest of the finest.
perpendicular force acting on an object will only change the direction of its velocity, not its magnitude. The explanation that was provided to me is that because there no force in the direction of its velocity, 
0
2015-08-23T21:42:54+05:30

This Is a Certified Answer

×
Certified answers contain reliable, trustworthy information vouched for by a hand-picked team of experts. Brainly has millions of high quality answers, all of them carefully moderated by our most trusted community members, but certified answers are the finest of the finest.
both net speed and direction will change or only the direction will change -- depends on the way force acts.

If the force acts  at one instant perpendicular to the velocity of the particle, then the direction of the particle changes.  The speed also changes due to the impulse (force * time duration it acts).  The resultant velocity will be more in magnitude (vector sum of the two perpendicular components).
================

If the force acts continuously at right angles to the velocity of the particle, then the particle goes around in a circle.  This is like the planetary motion, Earth moving around the Sun.  This is called uniform circular motion.

  Since the change in velocity is always perpendicular to itself, it contributes to change in the direction only.  The force supplies the centripetal acceleration. The speed and kinetic energy of the particle remain constant.

1 5 1
click on thanks button above
Comment has been deleted