Answers

2016-01-30T11:57:33+05:30
Asoka’s religion presents two prominent aspects, namely, his personal faith in Buddhism, and his desire to propagate a universal Dharma or Law. His personal religion was Buddhism which he embraced after the Kalinga War. In his Rock Edict at Maski, he described himself as a Buddha-Sakya. His Bhabru Rock Edict shows his faith in the Buddhist Trinity, namely, Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha. In his role as a monarch-missionary he did everything possible to advance the cause of Buddhism. According to tradition, it was Sannyasi Upagupta who converted Asoka, and worked as his spiritual guide, and accompanied the Emperor on pilgrimage to Buddhist holy places. Asoka, however, did not desire to impose his personal religion on his subject population in India. Instead, he propagated a universal religion, acceptable to the people of all creeds and faiths. In his Edicts he inscribed the substance of this universal religion for the knowledge of the masses. This religion or Dharma was not Buddhism. It had no dogma or rigid doctrines. It was like a code of morals, containing the essence of all religions. It was, in fact, like a lesson in ethics, virtues and morality. The purpose of this religion was the elevation of mankind to a higher level of existence.
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2016-01-31T18:42:46+05:30
Asoka did not desire to impose his personal religion on his subject population in India. Instead, he propagated a universal religion, acceptable to the people of all creeds and faiths. In his Edicts he inscribed the substance of this universal religion for the knowledge of the masses. This religion or Dharma was not Buddhism. It had no dogma or rigid doctrines. It was like a code of morals, containing the essence of all religions. It was, in fact, like a lesson in ethics, virtues and morality. The purpose of this religion was the elevation of mankind to a higher level of existence.It is seen, therefore, that his inscriptions do not contain the Buddhist doctrines of Arya Satya. Noble Eightfold Path or Nirvana, It contained instead the laws of eternal and universal goodness. He preached: “Obedience must be rendered to mother and father, likewise to elders; kindness must be shown towards animals, truth must be spoken, these some moral virtues must be practised. In the same way the pupil must show reverence to the master, and one must behave in a suitable manner towards relatives”. Asoka says in his Pillar Edicts:”Happiness in this world and in the other world is difficult to secure without great love of morality, careful examination, great obedience, and great fear of sin”.
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