Answers

2014-11-01T21:15:31+05:30
Most Europeans, according to recent surveys, seem to think so.Still, significant numbers, especially in the United States and including quite a few feminists, have viewed such a ban as religiously intolerant, anti-woman, and anti-Western. They maintain that the state has no place in deciding what a woman can and cannot wear—it is her body, not public property;  that given the worldwide exploitation of women as pornographic sex objects, wearing loose, comfortable, modest clothing, or actually covering up, might be both convenient and more dignified; that because of the West's tolerance toward religions, the state cannot come between a woman and her conscience for that would betray Western values and that women are freely choosing to wear the burqa.Some Western intellectuals oppose banning the burqa although they understand the harm it may do and the way in which it may "mutilate personhood." Algerian-American academic Marnia Lazreg, for example, implores Muslim women to voluntarily, freely refuse to cover their faces fully—to spurn even the headscarf; however, she does not want the state involved.
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