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2014-12-03T23:12:06+05:30

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For the formation of iron oxide, there should be atmospheric oxygen.. hence it is not formed..
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our lungs take oxygen from atmosphere which is directly transported to alveoli from there haemoglobin absorbs that ATMOSPHERIC oxygen...
but wll tat not be in dissolved form..
haemoglobin doesnt have hands to carry oxygen...its an cell so it will absorb oxygen by diffusion..
. this is what i know... it might be wrong.. .thanks for letting me know tat haemoglobin doesnt have hands..
my pleasure...i was trying to reason with u..
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2014-12-03T23:38:16+05:30

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Haemoglobin is composed of two components : soluble haem(iron part) and insoluble globin(protein part). Even though it is composed of two components, haemoglobin  behaves as a single species and takes part in reactions only as a complete molecule, hameoglobin(Hb).

When haemoglobin reacts with oxygen, "oxyhaemoglobin"(Hb.4O₂) is formed. 
Oxygen is carried by the RBCs in the form of oxyhaemoglobin.

Haemoglobin never gives away its iron content to oxygen to form iron oxide.
The conditions maintained in the blood aren't favorable for the formation of Iron oxide. Iron oxide is generally formed in the presence of atmospheric oxygen.
Moreover, iron oxide contains iron in Fe⁺³ state and the iron in haemoglobin is normally present in Fe⁺² state.

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nice answer
Thank you! :)
:-)
Thanks...
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