Answers

2015-06-07T16:14:57+05:30
It was initially believed that the noble gases could not form compounds due to their full valence shell of electrons that rendered them very chemically stable and unreactive. All noble gases have full s and p outer electron shells (except helium, which has no p sublevel), and so do not form chemical compounds easily.
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thanks far the answer ....but why do Xenon and radon form compounds?
You are correct in thinking that as you go to higher numbers (i.e. closer to bottom) of the periodic table, generally the elements get more reactive.

You are also correct that this is generally due to larger atoms filling larger orbitals with a charge density further away from the nucleus.

So as we move up in size (i.e. closer to the bottom) of the periodic table we get more reactive. We ALSO get less stable, and this is what comes into play here.

Going with trends, Radon should be the mos
2015-06-07T16:17:30+05:30
It is initially believed that the noble gas could not form coumpounds due to their full valence shell of electrons that rendered them very chemically stable and unreactive. all noble gases have full s and p outer electro9ns except helium bcoz it it do not have p sublevel and so do not form chemical compound easily
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