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2016-05-14T19:41:16+05:30
Red Data Book of the Russian Federation (RDBRF), also known as Red Book (RussianКрасная книга) or Russian Red Data Book is a state document established for documenting rare and endangered species of animalsplants and fungi, as well as some local subspecies (such as the Ladoga seal) that exist within the territory of the Russian Federation and its continental shelf and marine economic zone. The book has been adopted by Russia and all CIS states to enact a common agreement on rare and endangered species protection.

The book provides a central information source in organizing studies and monitoring programs on rare and endangered species and their habitats. It is regularly consulted when developing and implementing special measures for the protection and rehabilitation of such speciesThe book provides a central information source in organizing studies and monitoring programs on rare and endangered species and their habitats. It is regularly consulted when developing and implementing special measures for the protection and rehabilitation of such species

The first Russian Red Data Book was based upon research conducted between 1961 and 1964 by a number of Soviet biologists. It represented the Soviet part of the IUCN Red List (hence the name). At that time it was just the Soviet Union's first organized list of endangered species, not a legislative document.

In the late sixties, more thorough research was conducted by request of the Ministry of Agriculture. In 1974, based upon ecological evaluation, a decision was made to introduce legislation that would provide for the protection of endangered species. This resulted in the publication of the first official Red Book in 1978 – a document that complemented law as a list of endangered species. Animals on the list were strictly protected and their treatment regulated by Soviet law. Since that time, constant revisions have been made.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, regulations on endangered species were instituted by each of the former Soviet countries. However, many of them had insufficient expertise and resources to maintain their lists and enforce common regulations; therefore, a common ecological treaty was made with mutual recognition of endangered species.

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