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2014-10-13T15:39:04+05:30

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Ice is less dense than water. That’s why it floats. We also know that ice occupies more volume than water. So the first thought is that the water level will rise. But the density of ice is lower than water. Thus, when the ice melts, it shrinks. but this is counterbalanced by the volume of ice that is sticking up out of the water. Thus, there will be no change in the level of the water from the melting ice.
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2014-10-14T22:52:33+05:30

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Let the mass of ice cube = m 
let the density of ice cube = Di

Let density of water = Dw
When ice is floating in water, let the amount of water it displaces = V. It is not m/Di as some part is floating above the water level.

Weight of water displaced = weight of ice block
                 V Dw g = m g         =>   V = m / Dw

When ice block melts, the mass remains same. The amount of water will be 
                   m / Dw        = V.

Water from Ice on melting occupies the same volume that was occupied by the immersed part of the ice cube.

So no overflow of water and no decrease in water level.

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